Nouthetic

Quite simply, “nouthetic” counseling is biblical counseling—it gets its name from the Greek work noutheteo which is usually translated “admonish” (Romans 15:14, NKJV). It means “to confront as a friend” and was the normal method of counseling before modernists invented secular psychology in the early 1900s. A study of older dictionaries shows that it took until 1973 for the word “counseling” to change from “giving advice” to “psychology” with its modern testing, processes, and therapies. That change gradually came about as the secular psychology influence changed our idea of counseling from that given by a pastor to that given by a secular psychologist.

 

During the mid-20th century, many Christians thought they could integrate secular theory into their counseling programs, mixing the Bible with psychology. That practice (called “Christian” counseling) was based on the false assumption that man can discover God’s truth apart from the Bible. In the late 1960s, a number of godly pastors saw the need to reject such damaging influences, and one man (Dr. Jay Adams) led the way in bringing biblical counseling back into pastoral ministry. While psychology is based on evolution and secular philosophy, biblical counseling is based strictly on biblical principles. For counseling to be biblical, it must be Bible-based, Christ-centered, and local church-oriented. Nouthetic counseling accepts the premise that the Bible is God’s Word (2 Timothy 3:16-17) and that it is totally sufficient for meeting all our needs (2 Peter 1:3-4).

 

Nouthetic counseling is a refreshing return to a strictly biblical method of problem-solving. Instead of focusing on the problem and expecting years of therapy, nouthetic counseling focuses on the biblical solution and expects the counselee to change—by the power of the Holy Spirit—conforming to the biblical model presented (Romans 8:28-29). Nouthetic counseling is effective for believers and begins with the evangelism of those who are not believers because biblical counselors understand that only believers can understand the deep truths of God (1 Corinthians 2:14). Since all believers have the Holy Spirit and God’s Word to change them (1 Corinthians 6:9-11; Galatians 5:16), biblical (nouthetic) counseling depends on the Holy Spirit to change the believer, using God’s Word as it was intended—to teach, rebuke, correct and train in righteousness (2 Timothy 3:16).

 

There are few colleges and seminaries that teach nouthetic counseling today, but the list is growing, as more and more Christians are seeing the weakness and error in trying to integrate secular thought with the Bible. Colossians 2:8 says, “Beware lest anyone cheat you through philosophy and empty deceit, according to the tradition of men, according to the basic principles of the world, and not according to Christ” (NKJV). That is the reason for the dividing line between biblical (nouthetic) counseling, Christian counseling, and secular psychology.

 

Trust JESUS

There is a way that seems right to a man, but its end is the way to death
Proverbs 14:12

 

 

 

 

 

Special thanks to gotquestions.org

 

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Esther NIV – Scripture Without Chapters and Verses

The Book of Esther

This is what happened during the time of Xerxes, the Xerxes who ruled over 127 provinces stretching from India to Cush: At that time King Xerxes reigned from his royal throne in the citadel of Susa, and in the third year of his reign he gave a banquet for all his nobles and officials. The military leaders of Persia and Media, the princes, and the nobles of the provinces were present.

For a full 180 days he displayed the vast wealth of his kingdom and the splendor and glory of his majesty. When these days were over, the king gave a banquet, lasting seven days, in the enclosed garden of the king’s palace, for all the people from the least to the greatest who were in the citadel of Susa. The garden had hangings of white and blue linen, fastened with cords of white linen and purple material to silver rings on marble pillars. There were couches of gold and silver on a mosaic pavement of porphyry, marble, mother-of-pearl and other costly stones. Wine was served in goblets of gold, each one different from the other, and the royal wine was abundant, in keeping with the king’s liberality. By the king’s command each guest was allowed to drink with no restrictions, for the king instructed all the wine stewards to serve each man what he wished.

Queen Vashti also gave a banquet for the women in the royal palace of King Xerxes.

On the seventh day, when King Xerxes was in high spirits from wine, he commanded the seven eunuchs who served him—Mehuman, Biztha, Harbona, Bigtha, Abagtha, Zethar and Karkas— to bring before him Queen Vashti, wearing her royal crown, in order to display her beauty to the people and nobles, for she was lovely to look at. But when the attendants delivered the king’s command, Queen Vashti refused to come. Then the king became furious and burned with anger.

Since it was customary for the king to consult experts in matters of law and justice, he spoke with the wise men who understood the times and were closest to the king—Karshena, Shethar, Admatha, Tarshish, Meres, Marsena and Memukan, the seven nobles of Persia and Media who had special access to the king and were highest in the kingdom.

“According to law, what must be done to Queen Vashti?” he asked. “She has not obeyed the command of King Xerxes that the eunuchs have taken to her.”

Then Memukan replied in the presence of the king and the nobles, “Queen Vashti has done wrong, not only against the king but also against all the nobles and the peoples of all the provinces of King Xerxes. For the queen’s conduct will become known to all the women, and so they will despise their husbands and say, ‘King Xerxes commanded Queen Vashti to be brought before him, but she would not come.’ This very day the Persian and Median women of the nobility who have heard about the queen’s conduct will respond to all the king’s nobles in the same way. There will be no end of disrespect and discord.

“Therefore, if it pleases the king, let him issue a royal decree and let it be written in the laws of Persia and Media, which cannot be repealed, that Vashti is never again to enter the presence of King Xerxes. Also let the king give her royal position to someone else who is better than she. Then when the king’s edict is proclaimed throughout all his vast realm, all the women will respect their husbands, from the least to the greatest.”

The king and his nobles were pleased with this advice, so the king did as Memukan proposed. He sent dispatches to all parts of the kingdom, to each province in its own script and to each people in their own language, proclaiming that every man should be ruler over his own household, using his native tongue.

Later when King Xerxes’ fury had subsided, he remembered Vashti and what she had done and what he had decreed about her. Then the king’s personal attendants proposed, “Let a search be made for beautiful young virgins for the king. Let the king appoint commissioners in every province of his realm to bring all these beautiful young women into the harem at the citadel of Susa. Let them be placed under the care of Hegai, the king’s eunuch, who is in charge of the women; and let beauty treatments be given to them. Then let the young woman who pleases the king be queen instead of Vashti.” This advice appealed to the king, and he followed it.

Now there was in the citadel of Susa a Jew of the tribe of Benjamin, named Mordecai son of Jair, the son of Shimei, the son of Kish, who had been carried into exile from Jerusalem by Nebuchadnezzar king of Babylon, among those taken captive with Jehoiachin king of Judah. Mordecai had a cousin named Hadassah, whom he had brought up because she had neither father nor mother. This young woman, who was also known as Esther, had a lovely figure and was beautiful. Mordecai had taken her as his own daughter when her father and mother died.

When the king’s order and edict had been proclaimed, many young women were brought to the citadel of Susa and put under the care of Hegai. Esther also was taken to the king’s palace and entrusted to Hegai, who had charge of the harem. She pleased him and won his favor. Immediately he provided her with her beauty treatments and special food. He assigned to her seven female attendants selected from the king’s palace and moved her and her attendants into the best place in the harem.

Esther had not revealed her nationality and family background, because Mordecai had forbidden her to do so. Every day he walked back and forth near the courtyard of the harem to find out how Esther was and what was happening to her.

Before a young woman’s turn came to go in to King Xerxes, she had to complete twelve months of beauty treatments prescribed for the women, six months with oil of myrrh and six with perfumes and cosmetics. And this is how she would go to the king: Anything she wanted was given her to take with her from the harem to the king’s palace. In the evening she would go there and in the morning return to another part of the harem to the care of Shaashgaz, the king’s eunuch who was in charge of the concubines. She would not return to the king unless he was pleased with her and summoned her by name.

When the turn came for Esther (the young woman Mordecai had adopted, the daughter of his uncle Abihail) to go to the king, she asked for nothing other than what Hegai, the king’s eunuch who was in charge of the harem, suggested. And Esther won the favor of everyone who saw her. She was taken to King Xerxes in the royal residence in the tenth month, the month of Tebeth, in the seventh year of his reign.

Now the king was attracted to Esther more than to any of the other women, and she won his favor and approval more than any of the other virgins. So he set a royal crown on her head and made her queen instead of Vashti. And the king gave a great banquet, Esther’s banquet, for all his nobles and officials. He proclaimed a holiday throughout the provinces and distributed gifts with royal liberality.

When the virgins were assembled a second time, Mordecai was sitting at the king’s gate. But Esther had kept secret her family background and nationality just as Mordecai had told her to do, for she continued to follow Mordecai’s instructions as she had done when he was bringing her up.

During the time Mordecai was sitting at the king’s gate, Bigthana and Teresh, two of the king’s officers who guarded the doorway, became angry and conspired to assassinate King Xerxes. But Mordecai found out about the plot and told Queen Esther, who in turn reported it to the king, giving credit to Mordecai. And when the report was investigated and found to be true, the two officials were impaled on poles. All this was recorded in the book of the annals in the presence of the king.

After these events, King Xerxes honored Haman son of Hammedatha, the Agagite, elevating him and giving him a seat of honor higher than that of all the other nobles. All the royal officials at the king’s gate knelt down and paid honor to Haman, for the king had commanded this concerning him. But Mordecai would not kneel down or pay him honor.

Then the royal officials at the king’s gate asked Mordecai, “Why do you disobey the king’s command?” Day after day they spoke to him but he refused to comply. Therefore they told Haman about it to see whether Mordecai’s behavior would be tolerated, for he had told them he was a Jew.

When Haman saw that Mordecai would not kneel down or pay him honor, he was enraged. Yet having learned who Mordecai’s people were, he scorned the idea of killing only Mordecai. Instead Haman looked for a way to destroy all Mordecai’s people, the Jews, throughout the whole kingdom of Xerxes.

In the twelfth year of King Xerxes, in the first month, the month of Nisan, the pur (that is, the lot) was cast in the presence of Haman to select a day and month. And the lot fell on the twelfth month, the month of Adar.

Then Haman said to King Xerxes, “There is a certain people dispersed among the peoples in all the provinces of your kingdom who keep themselves separate. Their customs are different from those of all other people, and they do not obey the king’s laws; it is not in the king’s best interest to tolerate them. If it pleases the king, let a decree be issued to destroy them, and I will give ten thousand talents of silver to the king’s administrators for the royal treasury.”

So the king took his signet ring from his finger and gave it to Haman son of Hammedatha, the Agagite, the enemy of the Jews. “Keep the money,” the king said to Haman, “and do with the people as you please.”

Then on the thirteenth day of the first month the royal secretaries were summoned. They wrote out in the script of each province and in the language of each people all Haman’s orders to the king’s satraps, the governors of the various provinces and the nobles of the various peoples. These were written in the name of King Xerxes himself and sealed with his own ring. Dispatches were sent by couriers to all the king’s provinces with the order to destroy, kill and annihilate all the Jews—young and old, women and children—on a single day, the thirteenth day of the twelfth month, the month of Adar, and to plunder their goods. A copy of the text of the edict was to be issued as law in every province and made known to the people of every nationality so they would be ready for that day.

The couriers went out, spurred on by the king’s command, and the edict was issued in the citadel of Susa. The king and Haman sat down to drink, but the city of Susa was bewildered.

When Mordecai learned of all that had been done, he tore his clothes, put on sackcloth and ashes, and went out into the city, wailing loudly and bitterly. But he went only as far as the king’s gate, because no one clothed in sackcloth was allowed to enter it. In every province to which the edict and order of the king came, there was great mourning among the Jews, with fasting, weeping and wailing. Many lay in sackcloth and ashes.

When Esther’s eunuchs and female attendants came and told her about Mordecai, she was in great distress. She sent clothes for him to put on instead of his sackcloth, but he would not accept them. Then Esther summoned Hathak, one of the king’s eunuchs assigned to attend her, and ordered him to find out what was troubling Mordecai and why.

So Hathak went out to Mordecai in the open square of the city in front of the king’s gate. Mordecai told him everything that had happened to him, including the exact amount of money Haman had promised to pay into the royal treasury for the destruction of the Jews. He also gave him a copy of the text of the edict for their annihilation, which had been published in Susa, to show to Esther and explain it to her, and he told him to instruct her to go into the king’s presence to beg for mercy and plead with him for her people.

Hathak went back and reported to Esther what Mordecai had said. Then she instructed him to say to Mordecai, “All the king’s officials and the people of the royal provinces know that for any man or woman who approaches the king in the inner court without being summoned the king has but one law: that they be put to death unless the king extends the gold scepter to them and spares their lives. But thirty days have passed since I was called to go to the king.”

When Esther’s words were reported to Mordecai, he sent back this answer: “Do not think that because you are in the king’s house you alone of all the Jews will escape. For if you remain silent at this time, relief and deliverance for the Jews will arise from another place, but you and your father’s family will perish. And who knows but that you have come to your royal position for such a time as this?”

Then Esther sent this reply to Mordecai: “Go, gather together all the Jews who are in Susa, and fast for me. Do not eat or drink for three days, night or day. I and my attendants will fast as you do. When this is done, I will go to the king, even though it is against the law. And if I perish, I perish.”

So Mordecai went away and carried out all of Esther’s instructions.

On the third day Esther put on her royal robes and stood in the inner court of the palace, in front of the king’s hall. The king was sitting on his royal throne in the hall, facing the entrance. When he saw Queen Esther standing in the court, he was pleased with her and held out to her the gold scepter that was in his hand. So Esther approached and touched the tip of the scepter.

Then the king asked, “What is it, Queen Esther? What is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be given you.”

“If it pleases the king,” replied Esther, “let the king, together with Haman, come today to a banquet I have prepared for him.”

“Bring Haman at once,” the king said, “so that we may do what Esther asks.”

So the king and Haman went to the banquet Esther had prepared. As they were drinking wine, the king again asked Esther, “Now what is your petition? It will be given you. And what is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be granted.”

Esther replied, “My petition and my request is this: If the king regards me with favor and if it pleases the king to grant my petition and fulfill my request, let the king and Haman come tomorrow to the banquet I will prepare for them. Then I will answer the king’s question.”

Haman went out that day happy and in high spirits. But when he saw Mordecai at the king’s gate and observed that he neither rose nor showed fear in his presence, he was filled with rage against Mordecai. Nevertheless, Haman restrained himself and went home.

Calling together his friends and Zeresh, his wife, Haman boasted to them about his vast wealth, his many sons, and all the ways the king had honored him and how he had elevated him above the other nobles and officials. “And that’s not all,” Haman added. “I’m the only person Queen Esther invited to accompany the king to the banquet she gave. And she has invited me along with the king tomorrow. But all this gives me no satisfaction as long as I see that Jew Mordecai sitting at the king’s gate.”

His wife Zeresh and all his friends said to him, “Have a pole set up, reaching to a height of fifty cubits, and ask the king in the morning to have Mordecai impaled on it. Then go with the king to the banquet and enjoy yourself.” This suggestion delighted Haman, and he had the pole set up.

That night the king could not sleep; so he ordered the book of the chronicles, the record of his reign, to be brought in and read to him. It was found recorded there that Mordecai had exposed Bigthana and Teresh, two of the king’s officers who guarded the doorway, who had conspired to assassinate King Xerxes.

“What honor and recognition has Mordecai received for this?” the king asked.

“Nothing has been done for him,” his attendants answered.

The king said, “Who is in the court?” Now Haman had just entered the outer court of the palace to speak to the king about impaling Mordecai on the pole he had set up for him.

His attendants answered, “Haman is standing in the court.”

“Bring him in,” the king ordered.

When Haman entered, the king asked him, “What should be done for the man the king delights to honor?”

Now Haman thought to himself, “Who is there that the king would rather honor than me?” So he answered the king, “For the man the king delights to honor, have them bring a royal robe the king has worn and a horse the king has ridden, one with a royal crest placed on its head. Then let the robe and horse be entrusted to one of the king’s most noble princes. Let them robe the man the king delights to honor, and lead him on the horse through the city streets, proclaiming before him, ‘This is what is done for the man the king delights to honor!’”

“Go at once,” the king commanded Haman. “Get the robe and the horse and do just as you have suggested for Mordecai the Jew, who sits at the king’s gate. Do not neglect anything you have recommended.”

So Haman got the robe and the horse. He robed Mordecai, and led him on horseback through the city streets, proclaiming before him, “This is what is done for the man the king delights to honor!”

Afterward Mordecai returned to the king’s gate. But Haman rushed home, with his head covered in grief, and told Zeresh his wife and all his friends everything that had happened to him.

His advisers and his wife Zeresh said to him, “Since Mordecai, before whom your downfall has started, is of Jewish origin, you cannot stand against him—you will surely come to ruin!” 14 While they were still talking with him, the king’s eunuchs arrived and hurried Haman away to the banquet Esther had prepared.

So the king and Haman went to Queen Esther’s banquet, and as they were drinking wine on the second day, the king again asked, “Queen Esther, what is your petition? It will be given you. What is your request? Even up to half the kingdom, it will be granted.”

Then Queen Esther answered, “If I have found favor with you, Your Majesty, and if it pleases you, grant me my life—this is my petition. And spare my people—this is my request. For I and my people have been sold to be destroyed, killed and annihilated. If we had merely been sold as male and female slaves, I would have kept quiet, because no such distress would justify disturbing the king.”

King Xerxes asked Queen Esther, “Who is he? Where is he—the man who has dared to do such a thing?”

Esther said, “An adversary and enemy! This vile Haman!”

Then Haman was terrified before the king and queen. The king got up in a rage, left his wine and went out into the palace garden. But Haman, realizing that the king had already decided his fate, stayed behind to beg Queen Esther for his life.

Just as the king returned from the palace garden to the banquet hall, Haman was falling on the couch where Esther was reclining.

The king exclaimed, “Will he even molest the queen while she is with me in the house?”

As soon as the word left the king’s mouth, they covered Haman’s face. Then Harbona, one of the eunuchs attending the king, said, “A pole reaching to a height of fifty cubits stands by Haman’s house. He had it set up for Mordecai, who spoke up to help the king.”

The king said, “Impale him on it!” So they impaled Haman on the pole he had set up for Mordecai. Then the king’s fury subside.

That same day King Xerxes gave Queen Esther the estate of Haman, the enemy of the Jews. And Mordecai came into the presence of the king, for Esther had told how he was related to her. The king took off his signet ring, which he had reclaimed from Haman, and presented it to Mordecai. And Esther appointed him over Haman’s estate.

Esther again pleaded with the king, falling at his feet and weeping. She begged him to put an end to the evil plan of Haman the Agagite, which he had devised against the Jews. Then the king extended the gold scepter to Esther and she arose and stood before him.

“If it pleases the king,” she said, “and if he regards me with favor and thinks it the right thing to do, and if he is pleased with me, let an order be written overruling the dispatches that Haman son of Hammedatha, the Agagite, devised and wrote to destroy the Jews in all the king’s provinces. For how can I bear to see disaster fall on my people? How can I bear to see the destruction of my family?”

King Xerxes replied to Queen Esther and to Mordecai the Jew, “Because Haman attacked the Jews, I have given his estate to Esther, and they have impaled him on the pole he set up. Now write another decree in the king’s name in behalf of the Jews as seems best to you, and seal it with the king’s signet ring—for no document written in the king’s name and sealed with his ring can be revoked.”

At once the royal secretaries were summoned—on the twenty-third day of the third month, the month of Sivan. They wrote out all Mordecai’s orders to the Jews, and to the satraps, governors and nobles of the 127 provinces stretching from India to Cush.

hese orders were written in the script of each province and the language of each people and also to the Jews in their own script and language. Mordecai wrote in the name of King Xerxes, sealed the dispatches with the king’s signet ring, and sent them by mounted couriers, who rode fast horses especially bred for the king.

The king’s edict granted the Jews in every city the right to assemble and protect themselves; to destroy, kill and annihilate the armed men of any nationality or province who might attack them and their women and children, and to plunder the property of their enemies. The day appointed for the Jews to do this in all the provinces of King Xerxes was the thirteenth day of the twelfth month, the month of Adar. A copy of the text of the edict was to be issued as law in every province and made known to the people of every nationality so that the Jews would be ready on that day to avenge themselves on their enemies.

The couriers, riding the royal horses, went out, spurred on by the king’s command, and the edict was issued in the citadel of Susa.

When Mordecai left the king’s presence, he was wearing royal garments of blue and white, a large crown of gold and a purple robe of fine linen. And the city of Susa held a joyous celebration. For the Jews it was a time of happiness and joy, gladness and honor. In every province and in every city to which the edict of the king came, there was joy and gladness among the Jews, with feasting and celebrating. And many people of other nationalities became Jews because fear of the Jews had seized them.

On the thirteenth day of the twelfth month, the month of Adar, the edict commanded by the king was to be carried out. On this day the enemies of the Jews had hoped to overpower them, but now the tables were turned and the Jews got the upper hand over those who hated them. The Jews assembled in their cities in all the provinces of King Xerxes to attack those determined to destroy them. No one could stand against them, because the people of all the other nationalities were afraid of them. And all the nobles of the provinces, the satraps, the governors and the king’s administrators helped the Jews, because fear of Mordecai had seized them. Mordecai was prominent in the palace; his reputation spread throughout the provinces, and he became more and more powerful.

The Jews struck down all their enemies with the sword, killing and destroying them, and they did what they pleased to those who hated them. In the citadel of Susa, the Jews killed and destroyed five hundred men. They also killed Parshandatha, Dalphon, Aspatha, Poratha, Adalia, Aridatha, Parmashta, Arisai, Aridai and Vaizatha,, the ten sons of Haman son of Hammedatha, the enemy of the Jews. But they did not lay their hands on the plunder.

The number of those killed in the citadel of Susa was reported to the king that same day. The king said to Queen Esther, “The Jews have killed and destroyed five hundred men and the ten sons of Haman in the citadel of Susa. What have they done in the rest of the king’s provinces? Now what is your petition? It will be given you. What is your request? It will also be granted.”

“If it pleases the king,” Esther answered, “give the Jews in Susa permission to carry out this day’s edict tomorrow also, and let Haman’s ten sons be impaled on poles.”

So the king commanded that this be done. An edict was issued in Susa, and they impaled the ten sons of Haman. The Jews in Susa came together on the fourteenth day of the month of Adar, and they put to death in Susa three hundred men, but they did not lay their hands on the plunder.

Meanwhile, the remainder of the Jews who were in the king’s provinces also assembled to protect themselves and get relief from their enemies. They killed seventy-five thousand of them but did not lay their hands on the plunder. This happened on the thirteenth day of the month of Adar, and on the fourteenth they rested and made it a day of feasting and joy.

The Jews in Susa, however, had assembled on the thirteenth and fourteenth, and then on the fifteenth they rested and made it a day of feasting and joy.

That is why rural Jews—those living in villages—observe the fourteenth of the month of Adar as a day of joy and feasting, a day for giving presents to each other.

Mordecai recorded these events, and he sent letters to all the Jews throughout the provinces of King Xerxes, near and far, to have them celebrate annually the fourteenth and fifteenth days of the month of Adar as the time when the Jews got relief from their enemies, and as the month when their sorrow was turned into joy and their mourning into a day of celebration. He wrote them to observe the days as days of feasting and joy and giving presents of food to one another and gifts to the poor.

So the Jews agreed to continue the celebration they had begun, doing what Mordecai had written to them. For Haman son of Hammedatha, the Agagite, the enemy of all the Jews, had plotted against the Jews to destroy them and had cast the pur (that is, the lot) for their ruin and destruction. But when the plot came to the king’s attention, he issued written orders that the evil scheme Haman had devised against the Jews should come back onto his own head, and that he and his sons should be impaled on poles. (Therefore these days were called Purim, from the word pur.) Because of everything written in this letter and because of what they had seen and what had happened to them, the Jews took it on themselves to establish the custom that they and their descendants and all who join them should without fail observe these two days every year, in the way prescribed and at the time appointed. These days should be remembered and observed in every generation by every family, and in every province and in every city. And these days of Purim should never fail to be celebrated by the Jews—nor should the memory of these days die out among their descendants. So Queen Esther, daughter of Abihail, along with Mordecai the Jew, wrote with full authority to confirm this second letter concerning Purim. And Mordecai sent letters to all the Jews in the 127 provinces of Xerxes’ kingdom—words of goodwill and assurance— to establish these days of Purim at their designated times, as Mordecai the Jew and Queen Esther had decreed for them, and as they had established for themselves and their descendants in regard to their times of fasting and lamentation. Esther’s decree confirmed these regulations about Purim, and it was written down in the records.

King Xerxes imposed tribute throughout the empire, to its distant shores. And all his acts of power and might, together with a full account of the greatness of Mordecai, whom the king had promoted, are they not written in the book of the annals of the kings of Media and Persia? Mordecai the Jew was second in rank to King Xerxes, preeminent among the Jews, and held in high esteem by his many fellow Jews, because he worked for the good of his people and spoke up for the welfare of all the Jews.

 

 †

Learn – Love – Life

 

 

Also check out:

One Night with the King

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yN5vInd9DkM

The “We Only Use 10% of our Brains” Lie

At first glance, this may seem like a meaningless topic but as I reflected on the repercussions that could result from believing this lie, I realized that it is absolutely imperative that people know the truth because of two sequential lies that would naturally result from this error causing confusion in a person’s world view.

 

1. There would no doubt be the speculation that says:
“imagine what wonderful and amazing things we could do if we could only tap into that other 90% of our brain”

This would be a harmful belief against our faith because it would be a crutch that we use to validate unbelief towards the possibilities of what already exists to us but are only accomplished through faith

 

and 2. the inevitable opposite effect that says:
“it’s not our fault that we are the way we are, we’re only working with 10% of our brains!”

This, too, would be harmful because it then rejects our responsibility and ownership for our actions seeking to use the lie as a crutch for our shortcomings

 

MRI and PET Scans show that every area of the brain functions even in doing simple tasks – just, not all at once. However, this is the same that we would expect from other parts of the body.

We know that we have muscle tissue all throughout our entire body. But when doing any one task, we also know that we don’t use every muscle all at once in order to complete it; just those that are necessary for the task at hand. The same is true of our brains.

Every part of your brain has a function that we need in order to continue on being, well, us!

And we know that our brains are working all the time because we have to constantly feed it, which shows that energy is being consumed and requires replenishing

I believe that the lie began from a misquote of something that famous psychologist/philosopher William James said that was taken completely out of context.

What he actually said after much study was:
“most of us don’t meet our mental potential”

This is still true today.

But rather than the error of believing that this means that we can’t do more, this actual means that the possibility is there, we simply don’t take advantage of it.

Why is this information important?

For You have formed my inward parts; You knitted me together in my mother’s womb. I praise You, for I am fearfully and wonderfully made. Wonderful are Your works; my soul knows it very well. My frame was not hidden from You, when I was made in secret, and skillfully wrought in the depths of the earth; Your eyes have seen my unformed substance; and in Your book were all written the days that were ordained for me, when as yet there was not one of them. How precious also are Your thoughts to me, O God! How vast the sum of them! If I should count them, they would outnumber the sand. When I awake, I am still with You.
Psalm 139:13-18

It’s important because God is glorified in that we would know the truth about Him and ourselves whom He has created in His image and likeness.

Therefore I tell you, do not worry about your life, what you will eat or drink; or about your body, what you will wear. Is not life more than food, and the body more than clothes? Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly Father feeds them. Are you not much more valuable than they? Can any one of you by worrying add a single hour to your life?

“And why do you worry about clothes? See how the flowers of the field grow. They do not labor or spin. Yet I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was dressed like one of these. If that is how God clothes the grass of the field, which is here today and tomorrow is thrown into the fire, will he not much more clothe you—you of little faith? So do not worry, saying, ‘What shall we eat?’ or ‘What shall we drink?’ or ‘What shall we wear?’ For the pagans run after all these things, and your heavenly Father knows that you need them. But seek first his kingdom and his righteousness, and all these things will be given to you as well.
Matthew 6:25-33

This also teaches us that although we may try to create many fictional justifications for disbelieving the truth about the true and living God, the onus is still on us. We are therefore without excuse if in rejecting the Gospel of salvation and the truth about God’s only Son we find ourselves in a place one day without the comfort of His forgiveness and love that He has freely extended to all the world at the cross of Jesus Christ!

 

My friends,
I implore you,

 

Trust JESUS

 

Maslow’s Heirarchy of Needs and the Journey of the Meaning of Life!

Many psychologists agree that it’s common practice for human beings to be a part of many differing social circles.

We’ve got:
Our church fellowship
Our family dynamics
Our occupational surroundings
Our social hangouts
Our downtime getaways
Etc.

We therefore have different things that each of these social surroundings lends to our development throughout our life

Understanding this is important to identify and relate with others at their point of need by knowing where your audience is on their own personal journey.

 

 

In 1943, Abraham Maslow theorized this model based on his own personal observations of human developmental psychology and the stages of growth we go through as we mature.

The model is not absolute, but a general reference for identifying the common levels in social behavior throughout society.

 MASLOWS HEIRARCHY OF NEEDS

 

 

What was most interesting about studying Maslow, was to find out that at the peak of his model, ‘he‘ identified the level that I labelled as “Meaning” with “Self Realization,” but in his later years after much reflection on life and his theories, he was quoted as stating:

“the self only finds actualization in giving itself to some higher goal (power) outside oneself in altruism or spirituality”

In other words, he realized that there was no “self” realization without first acknowledging that finite creatures cannot give meaning to themselves, but must look to someone or something both greater than themselves and outside of themselves in order to find meaning…

 

Brothers and sisters, this is the the great higher power that I seek to proclaim to you today!

Long ago….
“The God who made the world and everything in it is the Lord of heaven and earth and does not live in temples built by human hands. And he is not served by human hands, as if he needed anything. Rather, he himself gives everyone life and breath and everything else.

From one man he made all the nations, that they should inhabit the whole earth; and he marked out their appointed times in history and the boundaries of their lands. God did this so that they would seek him and perhaps reach out for him and find him, though he is not far from any one of us. ‘For in him we live and move and have our being.’

As some of your own poets have said, ‘We are his offspring.’

This man, is the man Christ Jesus, through whom, we have forgiveness of sins by his death and the shedding of his blood.

He is the propitiation for our sins; and not only for our sins, but also for the whole world!

For in Christ all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form, and in Him you have been made complete, and He is the head over all rule and authority

Praise the God of Heaven and Earth!

 

Trust the LORD JESUS the CHRIST!

 

Right & Wrong – A Clue to the Meaning of the Universe

A Clue to the Meaning of the Universe

by C.S Lewis
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QmHXYhpEDfM

For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men, who by their unrighteousness suppress the truth. For what can be known about God is plain to them, because God has shown it to them.
Romans 1:18-19

 

How Do You Measure Love?

If the whole universe is without any meaning, we should’ve never found out that it is without any meaning
C.S. Lewis

 

Deep down at the core of every human being we see this flaw in humanity both by looking outwardly at the injustices of the world, (e.g fighting and wars, etc) – from families and relationships to communities right up to nations.

We also see it inwardly as well, for we all eagerly profess that “no one is perfect” to justify our imperfect natures and even more so, would never equate ourselves – while maintaining soundness of mind – to be in any way having attained perfection either

But seldom do we realize that in voicing our view that our world is far from perfection, that we are in essence also suggesting that something within us believes that it should be.

To put it more clearly, by our affirmation that the world is imperfect, we have subconsciously affirmed that a line of perfection by which the current state and condition that our world and even ourselves are in, can be measured by – and we fall short of it.

This fact should stir some very serious thought in the unbeliever about the saving grace offered by Jesus Christ and the Good News of the Gospel

For it is not God, but our own consciences that have condemned us by the knowledge that quite honestly we are far from the perfect state that our perfect God created us to be.

The Christian worldview is the only one that offers both a first cause for this fallen state right at the beginning of creation (see Genesis 3)

And it is only our loving God who sent his only begotten Son to face the penalty that this breach in perfection has afforded all humanity.

Therefore, to reject so great a salvation could only be to our own detriment, for within the perfect love of God, he also offers us the freewill to choose making Himself vulnerable to the fact that humanity that was created in His perfected image and likeness, who has by their own volition fallen from their high position which was in perfect relation with Him, also has the freewill to reject His method of reconciliation, and now seeks their own methods of restoring that breach through what has now come to be known as religion – the effort of man.

 

The Gospel that was proclaimed from the beginning is something far different in terms of effort for salvation

 

Whereas religion says:
“You must do… (insert various traditional practices here)”

The Gospel says:
“There is nothing in you that will ever do”

 

So much so, that God’s only way of reconciling the breach between Himself and man, was to send His Son in the likeness of a man, to pay the penalty that we deserved for our imperfection.

He does for us what we are absolutely incapable of doing for ourselves.

And all this, a free gift that we receive simply by faith!

But why?

It’s because more than mere words, when God says:
“I love you”

He puts action to those words

 

Biblical Christianity contains the only tangible expression of God’s love for humanity in that the man Jesus Christ, who was God in the flesh, and was an actual man, actually walked the face of the earth, who was born of a virgin, and who lived a sinless life, who actually died on a cross, and who rose from the grave giving truthfulness to His testimony and teaching of who He said He was and every believer claims Him to be:

The Son of God!

 

Even the most depraved relationships we’ve encountered or heard of where some argument ensued because one person accused the other of “not really loving them.” proves this point.

Usually it is because of what that person “did or didn’t do” that is used as a standard by which they determined whether the mere words held any weight

Which proves to us that deep within us, even we measure love by actions

This also tells us that all forms of religion that lay the claim that their “God is love” would be quite the stretch for anyone to believe if it were expressed merely in words.

In Christianity it has been most beautifully expressed in more than words but also in the action of:

This is love: not that we loved God, but that he loved us and sent his Son as an atoning sacrifice for our sins
1 John 4:10

 

Choose Love

Trust Jesus

 

 

The Battle for Autonomy

Autonomy

1.The right or condition of self-government, especially in a particular sphere
2. The state or condition of having independence or freedom
3. The power or right of a country, group, etc, to govern itself

 

In the past months, as I study the evidence for Jesus’s life, death, and resurrection, applying the constant daily truths to my local evangelism ministry, it appears more and more to me that the problem with sin, our need for a Savior, and Jesus being that Savior, has never been a question with regard to whether or not these events really occurred.

I observed that the most constant objection seem not to derive from a place which lacks the necessary facts to conclude in light of truth, but sadly instead, from a place within that causes us to make a choice to disregard in spite of the evidence

Now this is important to understand because, to disregard that Jesus was and is who He said He was on the basis of lack of information, would entail that if there was evidence to prove otherwise, we would be A. willing to search it out to know the truth, and B. then change what we believe no matter what the cost on the basis of that truth.

But since the objection comes from a place that does not seek to search out whether the facts were correct, I sought to understand then, where was this aversion to truth coming from? Was it demonic in nature? Was it simply due to sheer neglect?

The answer of course, is made obvious from the scriptures them self, the source of all truth.

A serpent once said:

“You surely will not die! For God knows that in the day that you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.”
Genesis 3:4-5

These words have lingered long and had a place in the heart of all mankind since the beginning of time. The excuses to neglect salvation do not stem from a misunderstanding of scripture, nor from a lack of evidence, nor of an skepticism that the information was or could be false, or somehow changed over time – excuses that we would never apply to any other historical fact that is presented to us – yet these are what the most common excuses seem to entail. Therefore upon a deeper search, the realization is that it comes from a place of moral nonacceptance. A place that makes the value of the seething lies of the serpent ring true in all generations from a simple neglect due to unbelief, but that stems from a place that lacks the true depth of humility to search out that truth because of an already clear understanding of what knowing this truth will cost us to know

You see, to claim ignorance of something has been an effect of fallen man that can be exhibited in children even as young as 5 years old, maybe younger. The sort of thinking that causes us to believe that if I don’t see it happening, or if I close my eyes to it, then I can’t be held accountable to what that truth may cause me to now be subject to.

The mistake in this logic comes from a place, that has a false belief that “I” am in control, and to give up that control, somehow would mean that I am weaker, not able to guide myself, nor able to tell the truth from a lie. It’s a place that doesn’t see the paradox truth of humility.

For those who exalt themselves will be humbled, and those who humble themselves will be exalted
Matthew 23:12

Now, if we read this scripture and say to ourselves, “I’m a pretty humble person, so this doesn’t apply to me”. What is the measure by which we believe ourselves to be humble? Is it in comparison to our friends? Or to our co-workers? Or to those we hear about in the news?

Most likely.

This is because we have a knowledge of good and evil, so we see within ourselves an ability to judge ourself against another’s situation and give ourself a rank of being better or worst off than the other.

e.g. You move out of your parents home and you believe that anyone who still lives at home has not achieved what you have. They are somehow lesser and you are more

But what if the measure that you have been most prone to use in your fallen state of mistaken knowledge of what “good” truly is, was wrong?

 

What if a law existed that was so holy and pure, that no man, woman, or child on the entire face of the earth could have ANY reason to boast of their goodness to another, because in some way, shape or form, we all fell short of this one perfect law?

That my friends, is that the Law of Moses represents. It is not a law that makes people holy. It is a law that points out the sinfulness of all mankind, making every sin, truly sinful.

Only under a true understanding of that knowledge, and only then, can we begin to understand and see our need for a Savior. This is when the “good news” of the Gospel of Jesus Christ begins to really look like good news.

Religions of all sorts has taught for centuries a false way of how “we” can make ourselves right with God. Either by our religious works, or our legalistic practices, or by our attendance, or by our giving, or by some other means of sacrifice and outward profession.

The true and biblical Jesus Christ however, is the story (beginning in Genesis) of God’s problem with all of His creation that cannot seem to understand their relation in distinction from His: perfect truthfulness, holiness, righteousness, justice, wisdom and love.

So much so, that out of that perfect love, He begins a plan of redemption to reveal unto His creation, the mystery of His holiness through the giving of His Holy Law at Mount Sinai, which then reaches the climax of this epic real life story which details the giving of His only begotten Son as the sacrifice for a nation that was doomed to eternal destruction to be killed by that particular nation, proving their inability to keep that law

Only at the cross of Jesus Christ do we witness that God is indeed Holy and Righteous and Just, so much so, that the punishment that abounds from sin cannot be overlooked. Punishment and death are the cost or we could not say God is truthful since His own law states that the consequence of sin is death and we all have fallen short.

But only at the cross do we ever have evidence in all of creation of the vast measure of God’s love. A love that surpasses all understanding. One that was willing to send His one and only Son to be the sacrifice for the punishment we all deserved to face for constant rebellion, even towards this truth.

Only a Savior of the world with perfect love and righteousness could look down from the cross He was hanging upon, being held up by His wrists in the face of His accusers and those who watched on glorying in their deed of crucifying the innocent, and hear Him cry out these words for mercy:

Father, forgive them. They know not what they do
Luke 23:34

Only He that is without sin could then rise from the grave having disarmed the powers and authorities, making a public spectacle of them, having triumphed over them through Him, showing himself alive and well to over 500 hundred eye witnesses. Fulfilling every prophecy, and then victoriously returning home to His rightful place right before their very eyes.

You may trust in your own wisdom, your own righteousness, your own ideas of goodness and understanding, your media driven ideas of love, and hypocritical moral ethics to secure your eternity when you shall stand before THAT God, the One true God who has proven such by His life, death, and resurrection, the One before whom ALL men will one day stand. But me….

I’ll take my chances with the Lord who lives!

 

Bless your Holy Name Lord Jesus!